Opera, srsly!

Tra le folie diverse de quai ripieno è il mondo ...

118,541 notes

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

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hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

(via arieled)

Tagged love that painting Antoine Lavoisier history Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze

18 notes

antique-erotic:

We’ve had two chaps on a wooden donkey, now let us enjoy a pair of U.S. Navy sailors posing with a real one! He seems to lack the usual long ears, but they’re simply angled sideways; perhaps he’s a little grumpy about being used as a photographer’s prop!"Ted R. Jay (on burro), c. 1917-1918, possibly San Pedro, CA. This faded picture postcard was taken while Ted served in the U.S. Navy in WWI. He served on the USS Bear, a famous ship that had previously played a central role in rescuing the ill-fated Greeley expedition in 1884 and served hazardous duty in the Bering Sea in the Revenue Cutter Service and later sailed to Antarctica with Admiral Byrd." (Source)

antique-erotic:

We’ve had two chaps on a wooden donkey, now let us enjoy a pair of U.S. Navy sailors posing with a real one! He seems to lack the usual long ears, but they’re simply angled sideways; perhaps he’s a little grumpy about being used as a photographer’s prop!
"Ted R. Jay (on burro), c. 1917-1918, possibly San Pedro, CA. This faded picture postcard was taken while Ted served in the U.S. Navy in WWI. He served on the USS Bear, a famous ship that had previously played a central role in rescuing the ill-fated Greeley expedition in 1884 and served hazardous duty in the Bering Sea in the Revenue Cutter Service and later sailed to Antarctica with Admiral Byrd." (Source)

0 notes

I hated it – Wigmore Hall and The Times

I hated it – Wigmore Hall and The Times

wigmore times

I am more than just mildly annoyed. Annoyed not because someone just “hated it.” I’m annoyed because instead of a review, The Times decided to publish a pretentious hate-piece designed to insult musicians and audience alike. It worked.

I am referring to the review of “Music for a While” at Wigmore Hall, published by the Times. Here is the online version: [x]

The piece is written to emotionalize.…

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Tagged Jaroussky wigmore hall